It’s Mainly About Lulworth Cove & Durdle Door

Some Photos from the week 8 – 14th January 2018

The first image here touches on one reason I take photos. It’s a record of a run/ walk at the gym. I tend to take a couple of these every week and obviously they’re not works of art. But they touch on one reason I picked up a camera as a child.  When I used to take this sort of evidence image as a child it was about my mum, who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia, being ill and behaving strangely. When I told adults around me what she was doing I was often ignored. So I started to take photos of what she was doing, because I felt it gave me some power over the situation. No-one could deny the photograph the way they could deny my words.

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Photographic record keeping at the gym

I went to Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door which I’m lucky enough to live about 30 minutes away from. I don’t go there much, which is strange. This sea image is part of my current experimentation with out-of-focus images. It’s partly about a message: I was thinking about the future and vision being part of the way we talk about it, and to have the image unfocused seemed to make more sense in that context. I am also playing around with how out of focus the camera will go, and how different subjects appear. How far can I push it without totally loosing the subject?

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Lulworth Cove, purposefully out-of-focus

This sun image is probably going to be part of my assignment. To me it feels like death. Not in a maudlin or miserable way, but in quite a hopeful way. Maybe it’s more like a final journey.

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Lulworth Cove, taken about 11am

It was misty in the distance; this is an image of the indistinct line between sky and sea.

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Where sea and sky meet, view from Durdle Door

When I watched the waves coming in to Man O’War cove, they were making several different patterns. I tried to get an example of each of them. I would have liked to have had a tripod, but I find carrying too much equipment a pain that often stops me from taking any images at all. I also found there were some images I couldn’t take. I took the ISO as low as it would go, the f-stop as high as it would go, but I couldn’t set a shutter speed that would capture any movement – I just got burnt out images when I tried. So I think a filter is on the shopping list now.

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Man O’War Cove. I didn’t have a tripod with me but I loved the white shapes the waves were making

There are so many images of Durdle Door that I wanted to experiment and try to see if I could get something that was still a photograph of Durdle Door without being so obvious about it.

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Experimenting with different views of Durdle Door.

I saw this padlock on my walk. I was moved by it; my sister’s baby died and I can’t imagine anything worse.

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On the walk from Lulworth Cove to Durdle Door

I had my polaroid in my bag, so I took a couple of images – this was my favourite. I did an emulsion lift on it.

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Polaroid on Impossible Black and White, Durdle Door

Nearly ten years ago, in response to the fairly standard parent-to-small-child question ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ I got the totally non-standard answer ‘I’m a film director. I direct horror films.’ When you’re expecting to hear ‘policeman’ or ‘fireman’ it’s a bit of a shock, especially from a four year old who had never seen a horror film and shouldn’t have even heard of film directing. Anyway, the film director is now 13 so I’ve decided to take him to film classes at Arts University Bournemouth. This is a view from the refectory. I had been thinking about the ‘point’ exercise – I think about it a lot. I saw the reflection of several gulls flying around and they seemed a perfect example of it, but as soon as I got my iPhone out they disappeared. So I sat with it ready and waiting, waiting for the gulls to reappear. And they did.

The class he takes lasts for three hours, but it works well for me because I can use the library while he’s there. So I’ve finally got to see many of the books recommended in the OCA course text.

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View from the refectory, Arts University Bournemouth

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